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Konjac Noodles Salad

Konjac Noodles Salad

KONJAC NOODLES

Konjac noodles (sometimes called Shirataki noodles) are translucent, thin, long, white, gelatinous noodles made from the root of the Kojac plant that grows in Japan and China, and are common in Asian Cuisine. The noodle contains lots of soluble fibre, called glucomannan and water. In fact, they are about 97% water and 3% soluble fiber (glucomannan). Glucomannan can absorb up to fifty times its weight in water.

Can help you to lose weight…

Because they are extremely low in carbohydrates, calories and fat, it is the perfect option for people who want to lose weight and aid their new year’s resolution. They are very easy to prepare and gluten free.

Konjac noodles are very filling, and their soluble fibre slows down the stomach emptying, so you stay full for a longer time on low calories. The noodles are generally tasteless and absorb the flavours of what they are cooked with.

However, they are “cooling” from a Chinese medicine point of view. Therefore, for people who have “cold stomach” or “weak spleen”  Konjac noodles can make their digestion weaker. For these people to eat Konjac noodles, simply add some minced ginger, which is warming and helps to improve the digestive function by neutralising the coldness.


Easy Pumpkin Soup

Easy Pumpkin Soup

This easy pumpkin soup is a very quick and nutritious one pot dish.

According to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) theory, Autumn is the season associated with harvesting what we have grown and storing produce for the upcoming winter. The days are still warm, windy and dry, but the evenings begin to cool more than in summer.

We want to take particular care of the Lung and Large Intestines during Autumn. Both these organs desire to be moistened so that the Qi energy can flow gently through them.

Root vegetables are usually abundant and my favourite pumpkin soup can help to warm and nourish the Stomach and Spleen, as well as moisten the Lung and Large Intestine.

It is a very quick, easy and nutritious one pot dish.

Cauliflower Fritters & ‘Nori Chips’

Cauliflower Fritters & ‘Nori Chips’

Cauliflower Fritters & ‘Nori Chips’

An article on Preventing Chronic Disease by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention places cauliflower 24th on the list of  “powerhouse fruits and vegetables”, using a nutrient density approach. It is a rich source of nutrients and trace minerals, especially calcium, magnesium, selenium, Vitamin K and many more. Cruciferous vegetables in general, and cauliflower in particular, provide important fibre and other benefits that may promote heart health, lower cholesterol, and may have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

Waste not, want not! These yummy fritters can be eaten warm or cold, and the leaves can be dried in the oven and made into delicious chips so you don’t need to throw out any of your cauliflower foliage. While the recipe is supposed to serve 4, these delicious fritters are hard to resist, so make sure that you get your share quickly because they won’t last long.

Chestnut and Mushroom Soup

Chestnut and Mushroom Soup

Chestnut and Mushroom Soup

This health-giving chestnut and mushroom soup is great during pregnancy because it is extremely nutritious and easy to digest. Chestnuts are high in fibre, folate, and vitamin C and low in carbohydrates.

Warming Vegetarian Winter Stir-Fry

Warming Vegetarian Winter Stir-Fry

According to Chinese Medicine winter means it is time to nourish and warm your body, to help get you through these cold rainy days. It is also the time to build up your internal stores, and replenish your Kidney energy.

A healthy, nourishing diet involves eating what is seasonal, and in winter that includes root vegetables, cabbage and brussels sprouts, mushrooms, and winter greens. At this time of year food should be cooked slowly, and some of the best meals are hearty soups and stews.

For something a bit different though, try this warming vegetarian winter stir-fry. Chinese five-spice powder is perfect for gently warming the body and supporting the kidneys, and the black sesame seeds are used to nourish the blood. They are readily available at Asian groceries, along with fried tofu.

The exact combination of vegetables doesn’t matter, so substitute in any of your seasonal favourites.

Keep the chili mild, and enjoy the gentle warmth of the spices.