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Exercise Pain Away

Exercise Pain Away

Exercise pain away – the difference between 90% pain-free, and 100% pain-free

I bet your practitioner has told you to ‘do your stretching exercises’ – and experience tells me that you did them – for a little while.  Then you felt better, and quit doing your exercises.

Let me suggest why stopping this might not be the best for you, and why taking better long term care of yourself is more important. The stretches are not just for when the pain flares up again. The stretches are not just for crises management.

You want the pain to stay away. Prevention is better than cure. You need to keep up your stretching exercises until the pain is completely gone and then continue the stretches to keep the pain away.  Maybe started doing Tai Chi weekly.

Persevering until your pain is completely gone, and then doing ongoing health maintenance does make a difference to your general well-being!stretching exercise pain away

This way you are less likely to have serious painful setbacks that drain your energy and productivity for yourself and others around you.

 

 

 

 

Exercise Your Back

Exercise Your Back

These gentle self-healing back exercises allow your body to stretch naturally and relieve the pressure on your discs and spinal cord that may cause back pain, as well as re-aligning your internal organs.

If you have general back pain, these back exercises and back relaxation techniques can be safely used for prevention, as well as relief. If you have disc problems we recommend you come in and see us first. Although these exercises may be useful for disc problems, modifications may be required to suit your individual situation.

Use exercises twice daily for best effect.

 

Prone Pelvic Relaxation

prone-pelvic-relaxation

Lie on your stomach with 3 pillows under your chest and 3 under your ankles – let your pelvis sink naturally to the floor and stay there for 10-15 minutes.

 

Supine Spine Relaxation Technique

Supine Spine Relaxation Technique

Lie on your back with a high pillow under your shoulder, and another supporting your hips.

Clasp your hands around your knees and let your spine stretch naturally.

 

Diving – Lower Back Strength

Diving - Lower Back Strength

Once your back pain is gone, this is a wonderful exercise to strengthen and stretch your lower back.

Lie on your stomach with hands by your sides.

Arch your back by raising your head and feet then relax. Your goal is to build up to 10 repetitions – but don’t try to do them all the first day. This back exercise is more demanding than it looks.

Exercise and Your Pain

Exercise and Your Pain

I see many patients who have recurring pain – they get fixed up, then it comes back again. It’s particularly common in the back, but also affects knees, shoulders and other joints. It’s the kind of niggling pain that doesn’t have a particular cause – but it’s there in the background. I tell most of them they need to do some exercise for pain relief!

Pain is the body’s way of telling us that something is wrong, and niggling pain is the body’s way of telling us we need to make some lifestyle changes – both large and small. If we pay attention, and take care of our body when it tells us to, we can hopefully avoid pain crises.

Our bodies are amazing – but they really weren’t designed to spend the day sitting at a desk or in a car. When our ‘core’ isn’t functioning properly other muscles take over and compensate. That moves our whole body out of balance, and that’s when chronic pain often sets in.

A friend of mine is a personal trainer who focuses on muscle building and weight loss, and has been rather dismissive of exercise like Pilates, Yoga, Tai Chi and Qi Gong because you don’t get the dramatic results. Recently he came to a class with me just to ‘try it out’ – he’s quite fit, but the demands placed on his internal muscles by this ‘gentle exercise’ left him gasping.

I often tell my patients that healing is as much about what you do between visits, as well as the session that I provide in the clinic. We are all tempted to settle for less than 100% pain free, but consistent stretching and exercise can prepare our bodies for a lot of things that come along.

Regular exercise that strengthens your core, protects you from injury, and improves your posture, can help keep pain away and increase your sense of well-being.

Easter at the Farm

Easter at the Farm

As you can see, I had an exciting holiday visiting the family farm in South Australia over Easter. It must be something about farm life that inspires people to work hard and have fun doing hard manual labour – cleaning my own house just doesn’t inspire me in quite the same way as scrubbing out a water trough for cattle does! My frozen shoulder didn’t complain either – which may say something about the cause of my pain and frozen shoulder in general?

I really love cattle, they are large, gentle and incredibly persistent. Perhaps they knew that I was helping them by scrubbing out and repairing their trough, because they were very interested in me and spent quite a lot of time nuzzling and watching me (or my warm, woolly hat!). Feeling their warm, solid bodies press against me, and their gentle noses investigating my woolly hat was a novel experience. Sadly, we don’t have enough room in our garden for a herd of cattle – or even one cow, so I couldn’t bring any back with me.

I am always conscious of the changing seasons, but farm life reminded me of the importance of rhythm in our busy lives.

Wayne’s dad is in his mid-80s but he’s still healthy and active, fixing fences, feeding cattle and doing tractor work. I wonder whether it’s the rhythm and reality of farm life that keeps him busy, relaxed and anchored to the world he’s in. His wisdom on life’s problems is more than just age and experience – it’s also a reflection of the seasons of life and nature that he sees all around him.

City-dwellers are really insulated from a lot of that – or maybe we’re just too busy and pre-occupied to notice it. Getting up early to cope with a sick cow, or staying up all night in the cold and the wet with one, just isn’t the same as sitting at your computer typing to meet a deadline.

I’ve brought back memories and lots of photos of the wide green spaces, beautiful clouds and clear reflections to remind me to pace myself and stay connected.

Pain Management

Pain Management

Chinese medicine treatment may be able to assist with:

    • Management of pain, stress and fatigue related to some autoimmune disorders, in consultation with other treating health practitioners 
    • Management of pain, fatigue and nausea related to many chronic diseases 
    • Management of vomiting or nausea arising from chemotherapy 
    • Pain relief and management 
    • Stress 
    • Chronic pain related to depression by managing the underlying chronic pain 

 

Are you pregnant? Chinese medicine treatment may be able to help pregnant women with:

    • Pregnancy related musculoskeletal pains
    • Nausea and vomiting

 

Conditions with strong evidence supporting the effectiveness of acupuncture

Our special thanks goes to AACMA – Australian Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine Association for The Acupuncture Evidence Project: 

The items below have reviews with consistent statistically significant positive effects and where authors have recommended the intervention. The quality of evidence is rated as moderate or high quality. (updated 28 Nov)

– Allergic rhinitis (perennial & seasonal)
– Knee osteoarthritis
– Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (with anti-emetics)
– Migraine prophylaxis
– Chronic low back pain
– Postoperative nausea & vomiting
– Headache (tension-type and chronic)
– Postoperative pain

Many health practitioners may recommend acupuncture as an adjunct treatment that may assist with IVF treatment. There is continuing research about how acupuncture can assist with the effectiveness of IVF treatment and you should consult with your treating practitioner/s about how acupuncture may be able to help you.

Acupuncture and Chinese medicine are generally considered to be safe in the hands of a well-trained practitioner, but occasionally (as with all health treatments) may be associated with possible adverse reactions in individual cases.

We recommend that you make an appointment to talk with one of our practitioners to discuss how we can help you.

Managing Pain

Managing Pain

Traditional Chinese Medicine is widely known for its use of  acupuncture,  medicinal herbs,  and  Chinese massage  which may be able to assist in  managing pain .

Chinese medicine treatment may be able to assist with:

    • Management of pain, stress and fatigue related to some autoimmune disorders, in consultation with other treating health practitioners 
    • Management of pain, fatigue and nausea related to many chronic diseases 
    • Management of vomiting or nausea arising from chemotherapy 
    • Pain relief and management 
    • Stress 
    • Chronic pain related to depression by managing the underlying chronic pain 

 

When a patient comes to us, one of the first things we may do are postural assessments and range of motion assessments that are very similar to those carried out by other health practitioners. However, we don’t stop there.  Our experience and training tells us that some pain might not be an isolated event.  A sprained ankle … is a sprained ankle … is a sprained ankle – but a few weeks down the track, that sprained ankle might also be a sore knee, hip or back as a result of stress and postural change.

The principles of diagnosis are the same, yet every patient is different. So we check your tongue, pulse, skin and nails. We ask questions about your work and lifestyle, about your family and relationships, about other aspects of your health that don’t necessarily relate to your immediate symptoms. Sometimes a stressful environment and a busy, hectic lifestyle may need to be addressed too.

Only when we have all the information we need, do we then decide on the best treatment for you. That treatment may involve a combination of acupuncture, massage, stretching exercises and Chinese herbs. This will depend on each individual.

When you’re young, your body has all the nutrients and trace elements it needs for growth and health, but as you age your hectic lifestyle depletes them. And sooner or later this will catch up with you. The herbs, acupuncture, dietary therapy and lifestyle changes that your Traditional Chinese Medicine practitioner may prescribe can gradually replenish these nutrients and restore the balance your body needs for improved health.

Prevention is better than cure, so it’s never too soon to start taking care of your health. If you start looking after your health before you have health problems, the chances are that you may achieve a healthy, happy, mobile, old age.